Category Archives: Landscaping

Before a Landscaping Project

Concerns to address before landscapers arrive at your property for landscaping projects

Call 811

811 is a free service that can alerts utility companies that you may want to dig for a landscaping project. They will send workers out to mark areas where there are pipes and wires underground. They can also be reached on the web at Sunshine811.

This is an important step when there is actual work about to begin. But if you’re one of those property owners that prefers to plan, plan, plan, then this is a good starting step even before work has been decided on. It may help you decide what types of elements you will consider for your new landscape project.

At any rate, it never hurts to have an overabundance of preparation. And, when work is set to begin, a quick call to 811 is easier than dealing with consequences of digging into a utility line.

 

Prepare alternate pathways

A new residential landscape project often means your normal pathways in and out of your house will be in use, particularly if the project is something like a paver driveway. Not just workers, but stored materials and machinery, will also need to use available space around your home. Prepare for this.

For example, if you know a project will take a week, and you’ll have to move sports equipment out of the garage for an event that week, it makes sense to get the stuff out before the project starts.

 

Inform your landscape installation team about heavy traffic areas

Your landscaping team may need to adjust their prep if heavy traffic is a concern, so let them know. This includes heavy traffic areas – both foot and vehicle traffic – and areas where heavy vehicles need to drive over or park.

Heavy traffic areas may also affect the time you’ll need to stay off a new installation. New driveways, walkways or other hardscape installations require different curing times until ready to support heavy traffic. The more information that your landscape team has, the better your chances for a long-lasting new hardscape.

 

Gated community or HOA concerns

If you live in a gated community, inform gate guards when workers will need access. Additionally, inform your landscaping team of entry codes for automated gate systems. If your community or HOA need to know beforehand when work is planned, please take care of this before work is scheduled to start.

 

Move the little things

Landscape workers, as a rule, try to work around things than to move stuff out of the way to make work easier for themselves. Unless, of course, there is a chance something will get destroyed or negatively affect a new installation. Then that item will be moved out of the way. However, it’s the little things that both homeowners and workers overlook that can cause a little abrasion.

Homeowners overlook things that are not in the direct line of work. However, these things may unexpectedly cause workers to change work patterns.

Workers overlook things that won’t be damaged or cause damage. However, they may kick up dirt and dust over items as they work without necessarily meaning to dirty things up.

The conclusion to be drawn is this: a little courtesy goes a long way. After all, what homeowners and workers want in common is to have a landscaping project go as smoothly as possible.

Let’s Make a Smooth Installation!

Our goal is a smooth, successful installation. Important concerns include a happy homeowner and clear access to the work area, so that we can do our best work with few distractions. Here are a few checklist items to help.

 

Don’t hesitate to communicate your needs

First and foremost, we are guests on your property. We’re there to complete our projects with efficiency and impeccable workmanship, which we’d like to do as respectfully as possible. The more we know about your property, the better the outcome. Workers will need to know where to park, any rules you have about workers on your property, and so on.

 

Unlock gates, prop open if possible

The less time spent unlocking and opening gates, the speedier the work will go. If it’s possible to keep areas propped open, please do so. If it’s not possible to open up areas, just let us know and we’ll happily adjust.

 

Gated community or HOA concerns

As covered before in our pre-project post, if you live in a gated community, inform gate guards when workers will need access. Additionally, inform your landscaping team of entry codes for automated gate systems. If your community or HOA need to know beforehand when work is planned, please take care of this before work is scheduled to start.

 

Other checklist items

We will be as clear as possible about the amount of time we need to spend on your property. On the day(s) work occurs:

  • Park household cars away from work areas
  • Arrange appropriate housing areas for pets (for their comfort as well as workers’) especially if they are sensitive to noise or strangers

How to Keep Your New Landscape… Well, New

Whether it’s plants or pavers, both living and non-living elements of your new landscape require post-care.

For living elements like sod, the first 4~8 weeks after a new landscape installation are critical. Improper follow-up care is the number one reason that lawn establishment fails.

Pavers and other area installations also need time to solidify and settle. No one wants a slightly sunken corner, permanently, in their new driveway. No matter the element, a new landscape design requires post-installation care.

 

Post-Care for a Landscape Installation: Your New Lawn

Don’t walk on new lawns! And only cut lawns after they have taken root. Let them take root with careful watering. Under- or over-watering are very destructive to new lawns.

Poor drainage, lower temperatures, and rainy weather require less watering. Too much water, which is a great concern in Central Florida, can cause fungus to grow. On rainy days, reduce or skip watering altogether. On the other end of the spectrum, dry, browning grass is a sign of dangerous under-watering.

We suggest the following watering schedule. It is only a guide. Adjust watering according to your landscape conditions and on the advice of your Classicscape lead.

 

Suggested Watering Schedule for the Sunniest Florida Days

In general, start your first morning watering as early as you can. Try to avoid watering into the evening, when there is very little sunlight left in the day. This can encourage fungus.
Again: on rainy days, reduce watering.

For dense grasses like St. Augustine and Zoysia that take longer to establish roots:

  1. Water 3 times a day for the first 7 days – up to 15 minutes if you have spray-type sprinklers, up to 25 minutes for rotor sprinklers
  2. Reduce watering to 2 times a day for the next 7 days
  3. Water once a day in the mornings until lawn is established
  4. Once established, water 2 times a week

 

In heavily shaded areas:

  • Water once a day in the morning – up to 20 minutes for spray-type, up to 40 for rotor

 

For humidity-loving grass species like Bahia:

  • Water once a day in the morning – up to 30 minutes for spray-type sprinklers, 45 minutes for rotor

 

Suggested Watering Schedule for Spring/Fall

Continue watering grasses like Bahia as you would a hot, sunny day.

For St. Augustine and Zoysia:

  1. Water 2 times a day for the first 14 days – up to 25 minutes for spray-type sprinklers, 35 minutes for rotor
  2. Water once a day in the mornings until lawn is established

 

In heavily shaded areas, water once a day in the morning – up to 20 minutes for spray-type, up to 40 minutes for rotor.

 

Suggested Watering Schedule When Temps Drop Below 75 F

Water once a day until rooted.

  • St. Augustine/Zoysia – up to 30 minutes for spray-type, up to 60 minutes for rotor
  • Bahia – up to 30 minutes for spray-type sprinklers, 45 minutes for rotor

 

Once rooted, water 2 times a week.